RETURN
TO
INDEX
RETURN
TO
INDEX

ABSTRACT

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 2002 Feb;68(2):602-7

Link to Article Source New window link indicator

Effect of Commercial-Scale High-Temperature, Short-Time Pasteurization on the Viability of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in Naturally Infected Cows' Milk

Irene R. Grant,1 Edward I. Hitchings,1 Alan McCartney,2 Fiona Ferguson,2 and Michael T. Rowe 1,3
Department of Food Science (Food Microbiology), Queen's University of Belfast,1 and Food Science Division, Department of Agriculture and Rural Development for Northern Ireland,3 Belfast, and Loughry College -- The Food Centre, Department of Agriculture and Rural Development for Northern Ireland, Cookstown, County Tyrone,2 Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

Received 25 June 2001/Accepted 26 November 2001

Raw cows' milk naturally infected with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was pasteurized with an APV HXP commercial-scale pasteurizer (capacity 2,000 liters/h) on 12 separate occasions. On each processing occasion, milk was subjected to four different pasteurization treatments, viz., 73°C for 15 s or 25 s with and without prior homogenization (2,500 lb/in 2 in two stages), in an APV Manton Gaulin KF6 homogenizer. Raw and pasteurized milk samples were tested for M. paratuberculosis by immunomagnetic separation (IMS)-PCR (to detect the presence of bacteria) and culture after decontamination with 0.75% (wt/vol) cetylpyridinium chloride for 5 h (to confirm bacterial viability). On 10 of the 12 processing occasions, M. paratuberculosis was detectable by IMS-PCR, culture, or both in either raw or pasteurized milk. Overall, viable M. paratuberculosis was cultured from 4 (6.7%) of 60 raw and 10 (6.9%) of 144 pasteurized milk samples. On one processing day, in particular, M. paratuberculosis appeared to have been present in greater abundance in the source raw milk (evidenced by more culture positives and stronger PCR signals), and on this occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from milk processed by all four heat treatments, i.e., 73°C for 15 and 25 s with and without prior homogenization. On one other occasion, surviving M. paratuberculosis bacteria were isolated from an unho-mogenized milk sample that had been heat treated at 73°C for 25 s. Results suggested that homogenization increases the lethality of subsequent heat treatment to some extent with respect to M. paratuberculosis, but the extended 25-s holding time at 73°C was found to be no more effective at killing M. paratuberculosis than the standard 15-s holding time. This study provides clear evidence that M. paratuberculosis bacteria in naturally infected milk are capable of surviving commercial high-temperature, short-time pasteurization if they are present in raw milk in sufficient numbers.


PARA's Analysis


Source: http://www.crohns.org/articles/2002_02_602-7_aaem.htm   Contact PARA: http://www.crohns.org/contact.htm
Paratuberculosis Awareness & Research Association